Environmental Health Division Laboratory Safeguards Wells and Septic Systems

Environmental Health Division Laboratory Safeguards Wells and Septic Systems

Testing Water Quality Protects Public Health

The Environmental Laboratory safeguards the quality of private wells and septic systems. Testing water quality is crucial to maintaining public health in Will County.

We are here to help you find answers to your water quality questions. We want you to know about the quality of your water so you can make informed decisions about its impact on you and the environment in which we live. Why do we test water? A large number of human diseases, particularly those of the gastrointestinal tract are spread through contaminated water.

The EH Laboratory supports the work of the division by testing potable water for bacteria, hardness, nitrates and fluoride. The EH Laboratory is certified by the Illinois Department of Public Health and NELAC for drinking water analysis.

All samples must be brought in on ice in one of our sterile bottles which can be picked up at any health department location. Samples may be placed in a sandwich bag or container with ice cubes. Please alert staff if you have a hydrogen peroxide system or a chlorinator when picking up sterile bottles. All water from private wells should be analyzed for bacteria at least once a year.

If laboratory analysis of your well water indicates that it is unsatisfactory for drinking or cooking it will need to be disinfected. A useful description of the procedures to be followed in the disinfection of your well is contained in our Well Chlorination Instructions. This document can be downloaded and viewed below.

Testing Fees   
Routine Bacterial Screens 
$20.00
Bacterial Screen with Count  
$25.00
Chlorine Check $  5.00
Nitrate Analysis $18.00
Fluoride Analysis $24.00
Hardness Analysis $18.00

Nitrite Analysis                     $25.00 which includes process and handling fees




 

Documents to download

Environmental Health Laboratory Location

Laboratory Location

Environmental Health Laboratory
501 Ella Avenue
Joliet, IL 60433
(815)727-8517

Environmental Health Laboratory Hours

Schedule for Dropping off Samples

Laboratory Hours: 

Monday-Friday:  8:30 am to 4:00 pm
(815)-727-8517

Fridays and the day before a holiday, samples are accepted until noon. Branch hours may differ.  

Contact individual branches for hours of operation.

Testing Water for Coliforms

Screening for Total Coliform and E. coli as an Indicator of Water Safety

Why should my water be tested for Coliforms and E.coli? Most Coliforms are not harmful but serve as indicators of the general microbial quality of water.

Testing for the Presence of Nitrate

High levels of Nitrate in Drinking Water can be Dangerous to Health

Nitrate is naturally found in many types of food. However, high levels of nitrate in drinking water can make people sick. Exposure to excessive concentrations of nitrate can cause blue baby syndrome as a result of asphyxiation since the blood loses the ability to transport oxygen. 

Hardness Testing

Hard Water forms Deposits that Clog Plumbing

Excessive hard water forms deposits that clog plumbing and requires more soap and detergents for cleaning and laundering clothing.

Fluoride Testing

Proper Amounts of Fluoride Helps Prevent Tooth Decay

Fluoride exists naturally in water sources and is derived from the element fluorine. It is important in the prevention of tooth decay. If you use a well, fluoride levels should be checked by a laboratory. The optimal level of fluoride in the water supply are 0.9-1.2 ppm (parts per million).   

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Environmental Health News

Illinois Food Handling Regulation Enforcement Act

The Illinois Food Handling Regulation Enforcement Act (410 ILCS 625), amended by SB1495, passed into law on August 27, 2013, changes the existing training and certification requirements for food safety managers, as well as establishes food handler training requirements. 

 

Prevent West Nile Virus by Eliminating Mosquito Breeding Places

Prevent West Nile Virus by Eliminating Mosquito Breeding Places

Reduce your Risk of becoming Infected by following these Tips

Reduce your risk of becoming infected by following these tips to eliminate standing water.

SWIMMING TIME MEANS INSPECTION TIME FOR WILL COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

SWIMMING TIME MEANS INSPECTION TIME FOR WILL COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Inspections Taking Place at Beeches, Pool Facilities

Water at 12 beach facilities and 132 pool facilities will be receiving regular inspections.
2018 ADOPTION OF THE FDA FOOD CODE

2018 ADOPTION OF THE FDA FOOD CODE

In preparation for the January 1, 2018 adoption of the FDA Food Code to the Illinois Food Service Sanitation Code Will County Health Department food inspectors will be providing information throughout 2017 on the changes food service operations should expect. One significant change is the requirement for a PERSON IN CHARGE (PIC). The Person in Charge shall be the permit holder or designated by the permit holder. The Person in Charge shall be present during all hours of operations. This means that when the permit holder or manager has a day off or leaves the food service establishment they must designate a Person in Charge. The Person in Charge shall demonstrate knowledge of food borne disease prevention, the application of food safety principles and the requirements of the Food Code. Not designating a Person in Charge that is capable of fulfilling the requirements would result in a priority violation that could impact whether the food service establishment will Pass, Pass with Condition or Fail the inspection. During this transition period it is important to obtain training for staff and to implement food safety procedures that all staff are aware of and practice on a routine basis. The permit holder and management team should become familiar with the FDA Food Code. It would be advantageous to create a written standard operating procedure manual. Also, establishing a chain of command to identify the Person(s) in Charge will be one step in ensuring that inspections result with PASS.

 

https://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/retailfoodprotection/foodcode/default.htm

WILL COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT IS THERE TO TEST YOUR WELL WATER

WILL COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT IS THERE TO TEST YOUR WELL WATER

Those With Private Wells Encouraged to do Annual Testing

If you live in a house that receives its water from a private well, getting it tested is as easy as a trip to the Will County Health Department.

RADON TEST KITS STILL AVAILABLE AT WILL COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

RADON TEST KITS STILL AVAILABLE AT WILL COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

New Shipment has Arrived; Test Your Home for Radon

Joliet- The Will County Health Department still has radon test kits available.

Documents to download

NEW STATE LAW ON SCHOOL WATER TESTING FILLED FEDERAL LAW GAP

Requires Testing in Public and Private Schools Built Prior to 2000

Joliet- After the Flint lead crisis, when it was noticed by many that federal law does not require schools to test for and address neurotoxic lead in their drinking water, Illinois was one of the states that took action.

RADON INFORMATION FOR HOMEBUYERS

Video Available Concerning Those Purchasing a Home

Joliet- Real estate professionals and home sellers in Illinois have a new tool to help them meet state legal requirements regarding radon in homes. A three-minute video developed by the Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) and the American Lung Association in Illinois (ALAIL) is now available to ensure home buyers receive information about radon as required by the Illinois Radon Awareness Act.

Documents to download

YOUR BEST NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION: CHECK THE AIR YOU BREATHE AT HOME

YOUR BEST NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION: CHECK THE AIR YOU BREATHE AT HOME

January is Radon Action Month

Joliet- January is Radon Action Month, and the Will County Health Department is once again offering simple kits that allow you to test the air in your own home for $8.00.

Documents to download

Botulism Outbreak Food For Thought

Botulism Outbreak Food For Thought

Health Department Working To Prevent Similar Incidents

JOLIET -- Foodborne botulism illnesses are rare in the U.S., but a recent outbreak in central Ohio illustrates what can happen when contaminated food is served.

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