Will County Health Department Videos
Expanded Investigation Into Multi-State E. coli Infections Linked to Romaine Lettuce

Expanded Investigation Into Multi-State E. coli Infections Linked to Romaine Lettuce

One Illinois Case Thus Far

Author: Administrative Services Staff/Friday, April 20, 2018/Categories: Home Page, NEWS

Rate this article:
No rating
The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and other state and local health departments, is expanding its investigation of a multi-state cluster of E. coli infections to include not only chopped romaine lettuce, but full heads and hearts of romaine lettuce.

Information collected to date indicates that romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified. However, the investigation now not only encompasses chopped romaine lettuce, but all romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona region.

One case linked to the outbreak has been identified in Illinois. To date, 53 other cases have been reported in 16 states with 31 hospitalizations and no deaths. The central Illinois resident reported consuming chopped romaine lettuce before illness onset.

Consumers in Illinois who have store-bought romaine lettuce at home, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.

If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine, do not eat it and throw it away. Before purchasing romaine lettuce at a grocery store or eating it at a restaurant, consumers should confirm with the store or restaurant that it is not romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. If you cannot confirm the source of the romaine lettuce, do not buy it or eat it.

Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. Restaurants and retailers should ask their suppliers about the source of their chopped romaine lettuce.

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and other state and local health departments, is expanding its investigation of a multi-state cluster of E. coli infections to include not only chopped romaine lettuce, but full heads and hearts of romaine lettuce.

Information collected to date indicates that romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified. However, the investigation now not only encompasses chopped romaine lettuce, but all romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona region.

One case linked to the outbreak has been identified in Illinois. To date, 53 other cases have been reported in 16 states with 31 hospitalizations and no deaths. The central Illinois resident reported consuming chopped romaine lettuce before illness onset.

Consumers in Illinois who have store-bought romaine lettuce at home, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.

If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine, do not eat it and throw it away. Before purchasing romaine lettuce at a grocery store or eating it at a restaurant, consumers should confirm with the store or restaurant that it is not romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. If you cannot confirm the source of the romaine lettuce, do not buy it or eat it.

Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. Restaurants and retailers should ask their suppliers about the source of their chopped romaine

People usually get sick from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli 2 to 8 days after swallowing the germ. Most people infected with E. coli develop diarrhea (often bloody), severe stomach cramps, and vomiting. Most people recover within one week although some illnesses can be more severe, resulting in a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

Talk to your health care provider if you have symptoms of an E. coli infection and report your illness to your local health department. You can also write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick and talk to public health investigators if they have questions about your illness.

Number of views (34)/Comments (0)

Tags:
Administrative Services Staff

Administrative Services Staff

Administrative Services
>

Administrative Services

The Will County Health Department's Administration Division provides many functions and is composed of several departments.
Video List
Illinois Sodium Reduction Week: PLEASE WATCH THIS VIDEO

Illinois Sodium Reduction Week: PLEASE WATCH THIS VIDEO

How many ways can you BREAKUP with SALT??? 
  • 895
  • Article rating: No rating
March 10th: Women and Girls HIV Awareness Day

March 10th: Women and Girls HIV Awareness Day

According to the CDC, about a quarter of people living with HIV in the United States are women.
  • 529
  • Article rating: No rating
The Importance of a Family Emergency Plan

The Importance of a Family Emergency Plan

Planning ahead during National Severe Weather Preparedness Week.
  • 389
  • Article rating: No rating
Tips for YOUR FAMILY for Severe Weather Season

Tips for YOUR FAMILY for Severe Weather Season

National Severe Weather Preparation Week continues.
  • 371
  • Article rating: No rating
An Educational Video on PrEP and How it Protects HIV-Negative Patients

An Educational Video on PrEP and How it Protects HIV-Negative Patients

The PrEP Clinic is available in the Will County Health Department's Community Health Center Care Clinic, 11 AM to 4 PM on Thursdays. 
  • 1198
  • Article rating: No rating
A Look at Public Health: Cause and Effect

A Look at Public Health: Cause and Effect

Public Health workers explain their causes.
  • 782
  • Article rating: No rating
MAPP Led Cooperation Leads to Behavioral Hospital Groundbreaking

MAPP Led Cooperation Leads to Behavioral Hospital Groundbreaking

A partnership between Silver Cross and US Health Vest to build a new 100-bed behavioral health facility, Silver Oaks Hospital, is now in progress.
  • 2581
  • Article rating: No rating
A Humorous Look at Taking Care of Your Health

A Humorous Look at Taking Care of Your Health

From the park bench, to the beach, to the doctor's office.
  • 1587
  • Article rating: No rating
PUBLIC HEALTH IN ACTION: FROM FOOD TO ANIMALS TO LANDFILL SPACE

PUBLIC HEALTH IN ACTION: FROM FOOD TO ANIMALS TO LANDFILL SPACE

One of their goals: that landfill garbage generated per resident will be cut in half by 2024.
  • 1680
  • Article rating: No rating
COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER CELEBRATES RECENT NORTHERN BRANCH OPENING AND NATIONAL HEALTH CENTER WEEK

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER CELEBRATES RECENT NORTHERN BRANCH OPENING AND NATIONAL HEALTH CENTER WEEK

The Will County Community Health Center offers a full array of medical, prenatal, dental, and psychiatric care for Will County residents and their families.
  • 1979
  • Article rating: No rating