MUMPS CASES IN COLLAR COUNTIES, BUT NO MUMPS ACTIVITY REPORTED LOCALLY

No Mumps Cases Have Been Reported in Will County after Recent Collar County Outbreak

Author: Website Administrator 10/Tuesday, March 7, 2017/Categories: Home Page, NEWS

Rate this article:
No rating
 

In the United States and in Illinois, the number of mumps cases can vary each year.  The disease typically peaks in late winter or spring, frequently coinciding with peak influenza season.  This statewide notification is being sent to remind health care providers to be vigilant in looking for signs and symptoms of mumps, to promptly report mumps cases to their local health department (LHD), and to consult with their LHD regarding testing of persons with parotitis for mumps and influenza.
 
Mumps, an acute vaccine-preventable viral illness transmitted by respiratory droplets and saliva, has an incubation period from 12-25 days.  Up to half of people who get mumps have very mild or no symptoms, and therefore do not know they were infected with mumps. The most common symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, loss of appetite, and swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears on one or both sides (parotitis).  Orchitis, oophoritis, meningitis, encephalitis, hearing loss, mastitis, and pancreatitis can also occur but are rare.    Laboratory confirmation of suspect cases is important, so buccal swabs should be collected from suspect cases and sent to a commercial laboratory that conducts Mumps PCR testing; or you may contact your LHD to seek approval for testing at the IDPH laboratory. The optimal time for buccal swab specimen collection is preferably within three days of onset in those previously vaccinated or within eight days after symptom onset in unvaccinated individuals.  Buccal swab is the preferred method over IgM testing for confirmation of mumps.     
 
Parotitis can also be caused by other pathogens such as influenza, parainfluenza, and Epstein Barr virus among a few others; therefore, testing for other pathogens can help differentiate between mumps and another viral illness.  CDC recommends that, during the 2016-2017 influenza season, clinicians evaluating patients with acute parotitis not associated with laboratory-confirmed mumps outbreaks should include influenza in the differential diagnoses and consider testing patients for influenza viruses even in the absence of respiratory symptoms.  If testing for mumps is requested at IDPH laboratory, IDPH recommends influenza testing also be conducted.  If influenza testing is needed at IDPH, providers should contact their LHD for authorization and instructions.  Please reference the IDPH Laboratory Manual of Services for more information about mumps and influenza testing.
Children should receive the first dose of mumps-containing vaccine, MMR, at 12-15 months and the second dose at 4-6 years. All adults born during or after 1957 should have documentation of one dose of MMR. Adults at higher risk, such as university students, health care personnel, international travelers and persons with potential mumps outbreak exposure, should have documentation of two doses of mumps.

In the United States and in Illinois, the number of mumps cases can vary each year.  The disease typically peaks in late winter or spring, frequently coinciding with peak influenza season.  This statewide notification is being sent to remind health care providers to be vigilant in looking for signs and symptoms of mumps, to promptly report mumps cases to their local health department (LHD), and to consult with their LHD regarding testing of persons with parotitis for mumps and influenza.
 
Mumps, an acute vaccine-preventable viral illness transmitted by respiratory droplets and saliva, has an incubation period from 12-25 days.  Up to half of people who get mumps have very mild or no symptoms, and therefore do not know they were infected with mumps. The most common symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, loss of appetite, and swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears on one or both sides (parotitis).  Orchitis, oophoritis, meningitis, encephalitis, hearing loss, mastitis, and pancreatitis can also occur but are rare.    Laboratory confirmation of suspect cases is important, so buccal swabs should be collected from suspect cases and sent to a commercial laboratory that conducts Mumps PCR testing; or you may contact your LHD to seek approval for testing at the IDPH laboratory. The optimal time for buccal swab specimen collection is preferably within three days of onset in those previously vaccinated or within eight days after symptom onset in unvaccinated individuals.  Buccal swab is the preferred method over IgM testing for confirmation of mumps.     
 
Parotitis can also be caused by other pathogens such as influenza, parainfluenza, and Epstein Barr virus among a few others; therefore, testing for other pathogens can help differentiate between mumps and another viral illness.  CDC recommends that, during the 2016-2017 influenza season, clinicians evaluating patients with acute parotitis not associated with laboratory-confirmed mumps outbreaks should include influenza in the differential diagnoses and consider testing patients for influenza viruses even in the absence of respiratory symptoms.  If testing for mumps is requested at IDPH laboratory, IDPH recommends influenza testing also be conducted.  If influenza testing is needed at IDPH, providers should contact their LHD for authorization and instructions.  Please reference the IDPH Laboratory Manual of Services for more information about mumps and influenza testing.
Children should receive the first dose of mumps-containing vaccine, MMR, at 12-15 months and the second dose at 4-6 years. All adults born during or after 1957 should have documentation of one dose of MMR. Adults at higher risk, such as university students, health care personnel, international travelers and persons with potential mumps outbreak exposure, should have documentation of two doses of mumps vaccine or other proof of immunity to mumps.  If you need to be vaccinated or need your vaccination records evaluated, contact your healthcare provider.  
 
Mumps is reportable within 24 hours in Illinois.  Prevention and control measures are needed for cases and contacts, so prompt notification is critical.  Patients diagnosed with mumps should stay home for at least five days after onset of parotitis.  Health care providers should report cases of mumps to their LHD.
 
Additional information regarding influenza and parotitis can be found on the CDC website or on the 2016-2017 Influenza Update for Health Care Providers.   To monitor the U.S.-wide mumps cases and outbreaks, visit the CDC mumps page.  If you have additional questions, please contact your local health department or IDPH communicable disease control section at 217-782-2016.   
                                                                                                                          

Number of views (240)/Comments (0)

Tags:
Website Administrator 10

Website Administrator 10

Other posts by Website Administrator 10
Programs & Services

Categories

Health Department Authors

Authors